Tare | Dream Meanings

What does Tare mean in dream?

Tare | Dream Meanings

Keywords of this dream: Tare


A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The brain is not a computer, but it has the power to compute.

The word computare is Latin, and comes from putare, to think. Neither is a computer any­thing like a human brain. But there are parallels. Christopher Evans, a psychologist, computer scientist and world authority on microprocessors, says the brain and computers are both information handling devices, taking impulses which in them­selves mean nothing, like sound waves, and processing them. It is also his theory that both computers and the waking-brain function are taken off-line to re-program. Our behaviour re­sponses and information bases need bringing up to date with any new experience and information that is relevant. In the case of the computer, off-line means having modifications made to programs, in the human it means sleeping and dreaming, the dream being the powerful activity of review, sifting and reprogramming. Thirdly, the brain and computer use programs. In humans, a program means a learnt set of responses, values or activities, such as walking or talking, but including more subtle activities such as judging social or busi­ness situations.

If, as Christopher Evans believes, dreaming is partly a pe­riod of revising and updating responses, insights and skills, then by working with the process one can make it more effi­cient.

The background for this statement is that many people have recurring dreams which change very little. Looking at this from the programming’ view, the attempt to revise is thwarted. But individuals can free such ‘stuck’ dreams by us­ing dream processing.

Also, as some dreams are obviously a synthesis of experi­ence and information gathered over a lifetime, the dream pro­cess is much more than a computing function which sorts new information and updates. It is also capable of creative leaps through synthesis and conjecture. J.B. Priestley’s dream of the birds (see religion and dreams) appears to be a mas­sive synthesis of things observed over a lifetime. It also depicts a brain function like computer simulation, which takes infor­mation and forms it into an expenmental view of possibilities arising from the thousands of millions of separate bits of gath­ered data. See ESP in dreams; creative and problem solving dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Little Giant Encyclopedia

Mirror of the soul, window of vitality and willpower. Since the eye, symbolically, also represents the image of the Sun, this dream points to vitality and courage. Here, body, mind, and soul are synonymous with heart, consciousness, and emotion. Often a sign of inner restlessness. Fear of missing something or being left out. Being aware of something but not wanting to see it, or simply being curious. Become a better and more thorough observer. Greed (“eating” with the eyes).

The color of the eyes and its symbolism is important. In our culture, green and blue eyes are very much eroticized. In Islamic countries, people protect themselves studiously from the “evil eye,” but being stared at in a dream is considered a good sign: it means being considered an important and interesting person.

Freud and Jung both considered the eyes—because of their shape—to be a female sexual symbol (the self- destruction of Oedipus is a castration symbol).

Looking yourself in the eye in a dream means self- knowledge; it is a challenge to have courage and see yourself as you really are. It is important who is looking, in what manner, and what direction. Open eyes show recognition and openness; downcast eyes mean a weakening of the willpower.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

Ariadne's Book of Dream

Referring to sight, attention to the eyes may reflect the power to see clearly in a situation. They may also represent third sight or psychic abilities. Blue eyes represent clarity and truth; brown eyes, wisdom and depth. Having something in your eye may be a response to having witnessed a painful situation. Closed eyes may remark on your refusal to see something you should face with both eyes open. Being stared at may reveal feelings of insecurity and shame.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

The Way of Dreams and Visions

General Meaning: A symbol of potential and opportunity.

• A field, particularly one that is fertile, speaks of possibilities and opportunities that await you. However it also indicates that some action is needed on your part.

• A field does not product fruit by itself. It requires someone to work it. Positive A Fertile Field • Seeing a vision of a fertile field speaks of a new opportunity the Lord is putting before you. It is for you then to work and to sow the seeds in this direction.

• This can relate to either business or ministry.

The Lord will bring the rain and cause the seeds to grow, but unless you plant, you will not see any fruit.

• Just because you see a field in the spirit, it does not mean that you will automatically walk in blessing. God is showing you, that He will give the opportunity, but now you must work and make the most of it.

• Psalms 107:37 And sow the fields, and plant vineyards, which may yield fruits of increase.

• If you see a field that is full of wheat and ready to be harvested, the Lord is telling you that ministry opportunities are awaiting you.

• It is for you to step forward in faith now.

The Lord will back you up with the anointing, but He is waiting for you to get moving and to do something first.

Negative:

Weeds • Often as I have been in intercession for the ministry, I have seen a field that is mixed with weeds and with good seeds as well.

• When I see this I know that the Lord is saying that there are some people in the ministry who have come to bring death and destruction.

• In a situation like this I pray that the Lord will separate the tares from the wheat. In every case, not long afterwards, the Lord exposes those who have come to bring division.

• If you cover a minister in intercession this is something you might see often.

• Matthew 13:38 The field is the world; the good seed are the children of the kingdom; but the tares are the children of the wicked [one]; • Dry Ground • To see a field with dry ground speaks of the lack of anointing in your life. It needs the rivers of living water that only the Holy Spirit can bring.

• Isaiah 44:3 For I will pour water upon him that is thirsty, and floods upon the dry ground: I will pour my spirit upon your seed, and my blessing upon your offspring:

See also:

Branch, Desert, Trees, Seed, Plants. ... The Way of Dreams and Visions

The Language of Dreams

(see Baking, Candle, Disaster, Forge, Hearth, Hell, Red, Sun, Torch)

A predominantly masculine symbol associated with the sun and intense passion. Native Americans additionally believe the condition of the fire appearing in the dream reflects your emotional nature. Is it burning out of control—or neatly tended?

Goodness over evil. Fire illuminates the darkness and chases away frightening shadows. Upon what areas of your life does this light shine?

Drastic transformation. This is the flight of the phoenix who must die in a nest of flame to be renewed.

Emotional devastation or a burning obsession. Look to see what exactly you perceive as burning.

Awareness and vision. Besides shedding light, fire was used as a divinatory tool in cultures ranging from ancient Greece to Tibet. Known as pyromancy, seers would stare at a flame source, watching for symbolic images to appear in answer to questions posed.

Elemental forces that must be tempered and controlled or they will destroy instead of empower.

Dramatics (being full of “flash and fanfare”).

Squelching: Ignoring or turning your back on the masculine nature, or resentment toward men. Alternatively, having a source of personal energy taken away.

Walking through a fire: Your reactions in the dream to this experience indicate how you are coping with a particularly heated situation.

Sitting amidst a fire: Being on the proverbial “hot seat.” Alternatively, a type of death dream in which the fire relates to the ancient pyres upon which bodies were burned to release the spirit.

Campfires: Simple pleasures, reveling in nature, remembering stories and experiences from youth (see Fables, Storytellers).

What’s burning here can be vitally important to your dream’s meaning.

For example, seeing a building on fire might indicate that you’re burning up your body’s resources / energy.

An attic fire can reveal someone whose mind is totally consumed by one topic. Dreaming of burning clothes symbolizes the desire to do away with societally designed images for a more honest self-representation.

Dreaming of a fire whose coals have grown cold is a very negative image. It represents trouble, despair, and possibly the loss of love among those people close to you due to a misunderstanding. Try to find a way to put a fresh warm ember into this situation.... The Language of Dreams

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Example: ‘1 dream insects are dropping either on me from the ceiling of our bedroom, or crawling over my pillow. My long-suffering husband is always woken when I sit bolt upright in bed, my eyes wide open and my arm pointing at the ceiling. I try to brush them off. I can still see them—spiders or woodlice. I am now well aware it is a dream. But no matter how hard I stare the insects are there in perfect detail. I am not frightened, but wish it would go away’ (Sue D). Sue’s dream only became a hallucination when she opened her eyes and continued to see the insects in per­fect clarity.

A hallucination can be experienced through any of the senses singly, or all of them together. So one might have a hallucinatory smell or sound.

To understand hallucinations, which are quite common without any use of drugs such as alcohol, LSD or cannabis, one must remember that everyone has the natural ability to produce such images. One of the definitions of a dream according to Freud is its hallucinatory quality. While asleep we can create full sensory, vocal, motor and emotional expenence in our dream. While dreaming we usually accept what we experience as real.

A hallucination is an experience of the function which produces dreams’ occur­ring while we have our eyes open.

The voices heard, people seen, smells smelt, although appearing to be outside us, are no more exterior than the things and images of our dreams. With this information one can understand that much classed as psychic phenomena and religious experience is an encoun­ter with the dream process. That does not, of course, deny its imponance.

There are probably many reasons why Sue should experi­ence a hallucination and her husband not. One might be that powerful drives and emotions might be pushing for attention in her life. Some of the primary drives are the reproductive drive, urge towards independence, pressure to meet uncon­scious emotions and past trauma and fears, any of which, in order to achieve their ends, can produce hallucinations.

A hallucination is therefore not an ‘illusion’ but a means of giving information from deeper levels of self. Given such names as mediumship or mystical insight, in some cultures or individuals the ability to hallucinate is often rewarded so­cially.

Drugs such as LSD, cannabis, psilocybin, mescaline, pey- ote and opium can produce hallucinations. This is sometimes because they allow the dream process to break through into consciousness with less intervention.

If this occurs without warning it can be very disturbing.

The very real dangers are that unconscious content, which in ordinary dreaming breaks through a threshold in a regu­lated way, emerges with little regulation. Fears, paranoid feel­ings, past traumas, can emerge into the consciousness of an individual who has no skill in handling such dangerous forces. Because the propensity of the unconscious is to create images, an area of emotion might emerge in an image such as the devil. Such images, and the power they contain, not being integrated in a proper therapeutic setting, may haunt the indi­vidual, perhaps for years. Even at a much milder level, ele­ments of the unconscious will emerge and disrupt the person’s ability to appraise reality and make judgments. Un­acknowledged fears may lead the drug user to rationalise their reasons for avoiding social activity or the world of work. See ESP and dreams; dead lover in husband under family. See also out of body experience.... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: Experiencing a need for quiet in a dream suggests that we need to listen more carefully to either ourselves or others in waking life. Our lives may be lived at such a pace that we have no time to ‘stand and stare’.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

In most ancient cultures, consider­ation and even veneration of dreams played a great pan. Some groups felt that dream life was more real and imponant than waking life. Not only were dreams looked to for information about hunting (Eskimo groups), but also for ways of healing physical and psychological ills (Greek dream temples) and insights into the medicinal properties of herbs, barks and clays (African tribal witchdoctors). Common to most of these groups, and evident in the Old Testament, was also the sense that through dreams one had awareness of the transcendental or supersensible. St Peter’s dream of the sheet and unclean animals was a turning point in the history of western socicty —as was Constantine’s dream of his victory if he used the symbol of Christianity.

At its most fundamental, the human religious sense emerges out of several factors. One is the awareness of ex­isting amidst external and internal forces of nature which cause us to feel vulnerable and perhaps powerless. Such natu­ral processes as illness, death, growth and decay, earthquakes, the seasons, confront us with things which are often beyond our ability to control. Considenng the information and re­sources of the times, one of religion’s main functions in the past was the attempted control of the ‘uncertain’ factors in human life, and help towards psychological adjustment to vali­ne rability. Religions were the first social programmes aiding the human need for help and support towards emotional, mental, physical and social health and maturity. Even if prim­itive, such programmes helped groups of people to gain a common identity and live in reasonable harmony together. Like a computer program which is specific to a particular business, such programmes were specific to a particular group, and so are outdated in today’s need for greater integra­tion with other races. Religions also offered some sort of con­cept of and connection with the roots of being.

Example: ‘For two nights running I have dreamt the same nightmare. I am in a chapel walking down the first flight of several flights of steps when I hear loud noises behind me. I am told to run, being warned of the soldiers who ride the cavalry horses nght down the steps, and who run you over if you are in their way.

The horses are fierce and they absolutely race down the steps at the same time every day, and you literally have to lock yourself away in a nearby room which is a long way down the chapel. I ran into the room hearing the pounding of the horses’ hooves. It was a terrible pandemo­nium in that chapel. In the room were school children the same age as me and some perhaps younger’ (Maria H). Maria, who is 16, in describing her dream says she had recently been confronted with whether to have a sexual relationship with her boyfriend. Religion, represented by the chapel, is Maria’s way of locking out her powerful sexual urges. Many dreams show that religion, as a set of beliefs, is used as a way of avoiding anxiety in the face of life’s uncertainties.

For many people, the rigid belief system helps them to avoid uncertainty in making decisions.

Dreams also portray and define the aspect of human expe­rience in which we sense a kinship with all life forms. This is the side of spiritual expenence through which we find a con­nection with the roots of our being. While awake we might see the birth of a colt and feel the wonder of emergence and newness; the struggle to stand up and survive, the miracle of physical and sexual power which can be accepted or feared. In looking in the faces of fellow men and women we see something of what they have done in this strange and painful wonder we call life. We see whether they have been crushed by the forces confronting them; whether they have become ngid; or whether, through some common miracle, they have been able to carry into their mature years the laughter, the crying, the joy, the ability to feel pain, that are the very signs of life within the human soul. These things are sensed by us all, but seldom organised into a comprehensive view of life, and an extraction of meaning. Often it is only in our dreams, through the ability the unconscious has to draw out the signif­icance of such widely divergent expenences, that we glimpse the unity behind phenomena which is an essential of spiritual life, i.e. we all have a life, we breathe, we have come from a mother, so share a universal experience.

Example: To quote J.B. Priestley from his book Rain Upon Godshill: ‘Just before I went to Amenca, dunng the exhausting weeks when I was busy with my Time Plays, I had such a dream, and I think it left a greater impression on my mind than any experience I had ever known before, awake or in dreams, and said more to me about this life than any book I have ever read.

The setting of the dream was quite simple, and owed something to the fact that not long before my wife had visiied the lighthouse here at St Catherine’s to do some bird ringing. I dreamt I was standing at the top of a very high tower, alone, looking down upon myriads of birds all flying in one direction; every kind of bird was there, all the birds in the world. It was a noble sight, this vast aerial river of birds. But now in some mysterious fashion the gear was changed, and time speeded up, so that I saw generations of birds, watched them break their shells, flutter into life, mate, weaken, falter and die. Wings grew only to crumble; bodies were sleek, and then, in a flash bled and shrivelled; and death struck every­where at every second. What was the use of all this blind struggle towards life, this eager trying of wings, this hurried mating, this flight and surge, all this gigantic meaningless ef­fort? As I stared down, seeming to see every creature’s ignoble little history almost at a glance, I felt sick at heart. It would be better if not one of them, if not one of us, had been bom, if the struggle ceased for ever. I stood on my tower, still alone, desperately unhappy. But now the gear was changed again, and the time went faster still, and it was rushing by at such a rate, that the birds could not show any movement, but were like an enormous plain sown with feathers. But along this plain, flickering through the bodies themselves, there now passed a sort of white flame, trembling, dancing, then hurry­ing on; and as soon as I saw it I knew that this white flame was life itself, the very quintessence of being; and then it came to me, in a rocket burst of ecstasy, that nothing mattered, nothing could ever matter, because nothing else was real but this quivering and hurrying lambency of being. Birds, men and creatures not yet shaped and coloured, all were of no account except so far as this flame of life travelled through them. It left nothing to mourn over behind it, what I had thought was tragedy was mere emptiness or a shadow show; for now all real feeling was caught and purified and danced on ecstatically with the white flame of life. I had never before felt such deep happiness as I knew at the end of my dream of the tower and the birds.’

Some Nonh American Indians developed the totem out of similar processes. In one generation a person might learn to plant a seed and eat the results. Later someone might see that through fertilisation more food was produced. Still later some­one found that by irrigating, still more improvement was made. No one individual was responsible for such vital cul­tural information, and the collective information is bigger than any one person, yet individuals can partake of it and add to it.

The totem represented such subtle realities, as it might in a modem dream; as Christ might in today’s unconscious. That older cultures venerated their collective information, and that modem humans seem largely apathetic to it, shows how our ‘religion’ has degenerated. Yet utilising the power of the unconscious to portray the subtle influences which impinge upon us, and building the information gained into our re­sponse to life, is deeply important.

With the growth of authoritarian structures in western reli­gion, and the dominance of the rational mind over feeling values, dreams have been pushed into the background. With this change has developed the sense that visionary dreams were something which ‘superstitious* cultural groups had in the past. Yet thoroughly modem men and women still meet Christ powerfully in dreams and visions. Christ still appears to them as a living being.

The transcendental, the collective or universal enters their life just as frequently as ever before. Sometimes it enters with insistence and power, because a too rational mind has led to an unbalance in the psyche—a bal­ance in which the waking and rational individuality is one pole, and the feeling, connective awareness of the uncon­scious is the other.

Although it is tempting to think of the transcendent as ethereal or unreal, the religious in dreams is nearly always a symbol for the major processes of maturing in human life. We are the hero/ine who meets the dangers of life outside the womb, who faces growth, ageing and death.

The awe and deep emotions we unconsciously feel about such heroic deeds are depicted by religious emotion.

See angel; Christ, rebirth and Devil under archetypes; church; evil; fish, sea creatures; example in whale under fish, sea creatures; heaven, hell; sweets under food; dream as spiritual guide. See also hero/ine; mass; masturbation; old; paralysis; colours; sheep under animals. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

New American Dream Dictionary

1. Challenging someone one is angry at.

2. Feeling that someone is observing one too closely.

3. Someone who is staring is attracted to the person being stared at.

4. Someone is angry at the dreamer. ... New American Dream Dictionary

Encyclopedia of Dreams

To dream of being able to stare clear up into the zenith while lying on sweet, green grass foretells Wealth and great happiness with the love of your life.

To dream that you have reached the zenith of your profession foreshadows a change of career, or you are in a deadend job.... Encyclopedia of Dreams