Dream Process As Computer Dream Meaning

What does a Dream Process As Computer mean in your dream?

What does an Dream Process As Computer symbolize?

What does dreaming of Dream Process As Computer mean?

What do Dream Process As Computer represent in dreams?

The brain is not a computer, but it has the power to compute.

The word computare is Latin, and comes from putare, to think. Neither is a computer any­thing like a human brain. But there are parallels. Christopher Evans, a psychologist, computer scientist and world authority on microprocessors, says the brain and computers are both information handling devices, taking impulses which in them­selves mean nothing, like sound waves, and processing them. It is also his theory that both computers and the waking-brain function are taken off-line to re-program. Our behaviour re­sponses and information bases need bringing up to date with any new experience and information that is relevant. In the case of the computer, off-line means having modifications made to programs, in the human it means sleeping and dreaming, the dream being the powerful activity of review, sifting and reprogramming. Thirdly, the brain and computer use programs. In humans, a program means a learnt set of responses, values or activities, such as walking or talking, but including more subtle activities such as judging social or busi­ness situations.

If, as Christopher Evans believes, dreaming is partly a pe­riod of revising and updating responses, insights and skills, then by working with the process one can make it more effi­cient.

The background for this statement is that many people have recurring dreams which change very little. Looking at this from the programming’ view, the attempt to revise is thwarted. But individuals can free such ‘stuck’ dreams by us­ing dream processing.

Also, as some dreams are obviously a synthesis of experi­ence and information gathered over a lifetime, the dream pro­cess is much more than a computing function which sorts new information and updates. It is also capable of creative leaps through synthesis and conjecture. J.B. Priestley’s dream of the birds (see religion and dreams) appears to be a mas­sive synthesis of things observed over a lifetime. It also depicts a brain function like computer simulation, which takes infor­mation and forms it into an expenmental view of possibilities arising from the thousands of millions of separate bits of gath­ered data. See ESP in dreams; creative and problem solving dreams.


A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences by


Dream Process As Computer • What Does Dream Process As Computer Mean In Dream?


Ariadne's Book of Dream

Apple computers are known for being user- friendly and are preferred by most artists. One may appear in a dream to spark your creative side. As the apple represents wisdom. this symbol may indicate that it is time to go ahead and use your wisdom to create something beautiful.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

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Dream Dictionary Unlimited

İmplies there is a need to process data... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

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New American Dream Dictionary

Suggestion to expand horizons. ... New American Dream Dictionary

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Christian Dream Symbols

Gathering or disseminating information ... Christian Dream Symbols

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

A symbol of mental discipline and the ability to coordinate. Help at work, impersonal perfection, indifferent precision; what is missing is the soul and the emotions. Warning: too career-oriented.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- The computer and other high technology images are now such a part of people’s lives that it very much depends on other circumstances in the dream as to the correct interpretation of this image.

If one works with computers, it may simply be a means to an end whereas in other cases it will be a reminder of personal potential or abilities.

2- We are making a link with past memories or stored information which we may need to access in order to progress.

3- The computer can symbolise spiritual records and the past, present and future.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Gypsy Dream Dictionary

Working at a computer in your dream means that you will have access to much information, including many secrets you have long tned to discover. Your immediate actions could have far-reaching effects.

If the computers screen is blank, then it signifies frustration.

If someone else is working at the computer, then you should be wary of giving out information you would rather keep to yourself. See also Internet.... Gypsy Dream Dictionary

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The Language of Dreams

The logical, analytical, rational, conscious self (see Calculator).

Technology and how much of a role it plays in your life.

Problems with: Disorientation, confusion, or communication difficulties.

Blank computer screen: The need to exercise your mind and get some “brain food.” Alternatively, hitting a dry period in the creative process in which your mind feels blank.... The Language of Dreams

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Ariadne's Book of Dream

A PC may reflect your concerns about work. It may metaphorically stand for the ability to process information or for brain function. Problems with your personal computer may point to difficulties in processing data internally or in thinking clearly.

For example, losing text may represent forgetting impor tant information. Accidentally deleting something may Indicate your losing information or forgetting ideas that are critical.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

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Encyclopedia of Dreams

The computer dream is one of personal understanding and as such should be viewed in conjunction with all the other signs in your dream.

The computer can also represent discipline and coordination to the dreamer, if the dreamers job involves the use of a computer then dreaming of it would be telling you that you are too wound up in your work and need to back off on the heavy work schedule.... Encyclopedia of Dreams

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Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreams of a computer represent your unique access to the universal mind. Throughout all eastern religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, the Goddess Religions, even Masonry, there is the belief in the one supreme mind and being that interconnects us all.

The computer is often used as a symbol of the one mind and your desire to connect and express yourself to others. See Internet.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

See communication, email and microchip... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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My Dream Interpretation

If you dream of a computer, pay careful attention to the other symbols in your dream.

The computer is saying “put the pieces together to understand the overall meaning.” Also, if you use a computer a lot during your waking life for work or play, your dream could be telling you to get outside more and take a break from the screen.

If you dream of someone hacking into your computer, there is a sense that your privacy is being invaded. You may be overwhelmed and have the feeling that you are at the mercy of another. Also see “Computer Game”, “Computer Virus” and “Computer Mouse”, below.... My Dream Interpretation

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Expansions Dream Dictionary

Mind-pattern.... Expansions Dream Dictionary

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My Dream Interpretation

To dream that you are playing a computer game, represents your ability to manipulate others into doing what you want them to do. Sometimes this dream also is suggesting that you are trying to escape from problems in your real life.

If you dream of being a character inside a video game, it means you are feeling controlled by others.... My Dream Interpretation

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Ariadne's Book of Dream

Difficulty in controlling the mouse on your personal computer may suggest that you are losing control of the direction of your thinking. It may signify confusion. It may also indicate that you are acting like a mouse rather than a lion, a little too timid for your own good.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

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My Dream Interpretation

A dream involving a computer mouse may symbolize your difficulty expressing certain feelings or views.

If you dream that your mouse has a mind of its own, you may feel a lack of control in your own life. Perhaps you are feeling overprotected, overwhelmed by stress, or both.... My Dream Interpretation

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Ariadne's Book of Dream

A desk with compartments that houses your computer this station may represent the human skull. It may also remark on concerns about organization at work.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

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My Dream Interpretation

To dream that your computer has a virus, suggests that something in your life that is out of control.

If you dream of sending a virus from your computer to others, you are insecure about how other people see you.... My Dream Interpretation

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Because of the ease with which computers can file, son, cross reference and present informa­tion, a great deal of work has been done in analysing the content of thousands of dreams (The Content Analysis oj Dreams, Hall and Van De Castle). As computers are an every­day pan of many homes, we can easily use them to gain insight into our own dreams. Two areas of help are as follows.

We can enter many dreams, then with a program such as Seeker or Masterfile, easily scan through them to see the fre­quency of dream themes. This approach to dreams—self in­sight through a series of dreams—is explained by Hall in The Meaning of Dreams. Important issues in our life and develop­ment occur as frequent dream themes, and are easily seen using a computer.

The program Brainstonn (Brainstorm Software Ltd) makes cross referencing dream symbols and associated comments easy. Using this program, if one dreamt of a tree and wrote one s associations, then six months later dreamt of a tree and entered this, the program instantly reminds you of the past reference to tree and can display it. Gradually a reference base of your own dreams and comments can be built up and quickly scanned. Such comparisons help to form a personality profile of yourself or others. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

The brain is not a computer, but it has the power to compute.

The word computare is Latin, and comes from putare, to think. Neither is a computer any­thing like a human brain. But there are parallels. Christopher Evans, a psychologist, computer scientist and world authority on microprocessors, says the brain and computers are both information handling devices, taking impulses which in them­selves mean nothing, like sound waves, and processing them. It is also his theory that both computers and the waking-brain function are taken off-line to re-program. Our behaviour re­sponses and information bases need bringing up to date with any new experience and information that is relevant. In the case of the computer, off-line means having modifications made to programs, in the human it means sleeping and dreaming, the dream being the powerful activity of review, sifting and reprogramming. Thirdly, the brain and computer use programs. In humans, a program means a learnt set of responses, values or activities, such as walking or talking, but including more subtle activities such as judging social or busi­ness situations.

If, as Christopher Evans believes, dreaming is partly a pe­riod of revising and updating responses, insights and skills, then by working with the process one can make it more effi­cient.

The background for this statement is that many people have recurring dreams which change very little. Looking at this from the programming’ view, the attempt to revise is thwarted. But individuals can free such ‘stuck’ dreams by us­ing dream processing.

Also, as some dreams are obviously a synthesis of experi­ence and information gathered over a lifetime, the dream pro­cess is much more than a computing function which sorts new information and updates. It is also capable of creative leaps through synthesis and conjecture. J.B. Priestley’s dream of the birds (see religion and dreams) appears to be a mas­sive synthesis of things observed over a lifetime. It also depicts a brain function like computer simulation, which takes infor­mation and forms it into an expenmental view of possibilities arising from the thousands of millions of separate bits of gath­ered data. See ESP in dreams; creative and problem solving dreams. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Below are described simple techniques which make it possible to gain information quickly from dreams. They have been put as a series of questions.

What is the background to the dream? The most imponant aspects of your everyday life may have influenced the dream or feature in it. Briefly consider any aspects of your life which connect with what appears in the dream. Example: ‘1 have a plane to catch. I get to the plane but the suitcase is never big enough for my clothing which I have left behind. I am always anxious about stuff left behind. I wake still with the feeling of anxiety’ (Jane). When asked, Jane said plane flights had been a big feature of her life. She had moved home often, travelling to different pans of the world, leaving friends and loved ones behind.

What is the main action in the dream? There is often an over­all activity such as walking, looking, worrying, building some­thing, or trying to escape. Define what it is and consider if it is expressive of something you are doing in waking life. Activi­ties such as walking or building a house need to be seen as generalisations; walking can simply represent taking a direc­tion in life. When you have defined the action, look for fur­ther information under the other headings in this book, such as swimming or sitting.

What is your role in the dream? Are you a friend, lover, sol­dier, dictator, watcher or participant in the dream? Consider this in relationship with your everyday life, especially in con­nection with how the dream presents it. Where possible, look for the entry on the role in this book. See dreamer.

Are you active or passive in the dream? By passive is meant not taking the leading role, being only an observer, being directed by other people and events, If you are passive, consider if you live in a similar attitude in your life. See active/passive.

What do you feel in the dream? Define what is felt emotionally and physically. In the physical sense are you tired, cold, re­laxed or hungry? In the emotional sense do you feel sad, angry, lost, tender or frightened anywhere in the dream? This helps clarify what feeling area the dream is dealing with. It is important also to define whether the feelings in the dream were satisfyingly expressed or whether held back.

If held back they need fuller expression. See emotions and mood.

Is there a because’ factor in the dream? In many dreams something happens, fails to happen, or appears . . . be­cause! For instance, trapped in a room you find a door to escape through. All is dark beyond and you do not go through the door ‘because’ you are frightened of the dark. In this case the ‘because’ factor is fear.

The dream also suggests you are trapped in an unsatisfying life through fear of opportunity or the unknown.

Am I meeting the things I fear in my dream? Because a dream is an entirely inward thing, we create it completely out of our own internal feelings, images, creativity, habits and insights. So even the monsters of our dream are a pan of ourself.

If we run from them it is only aspects of ourself we are avoiding. Through defining what feelings occur in the dream you may be able to clarify what it is you are avoiding. See nightmares; dream as spiritual guide.

What does the dream mean? We alone create the dream while asleep. Therefore, by looking at each symbol or aspect of the dream, we can discover from what feelings, thoughts or expe­rience, what drive or what insight we have created the drama of the dream. In a playful relaxed way, express whatever you think, feel, remember or fantasise when you hold each symbol in mind. Say or write it all, even the seemingly trivial or dan­gerous’ bits. It helps to act the pan of each thing if you can; for instance as a house you might describe yourself as ‘a bit old, but with open doors for family and friends to come in and out. I feel solid and dependable, but I sense there is something hidden in my cellar’. Such statements portray one­self graphically. Consider whatever information you gather as descriptive of your waking life. Try to summarise it, as this will aid the gaining of insight.

Try amplifying your dream You will need the help of one or two friends to use this method.

The basis is to take the role of each part of the dream, as described above. This may seem strange at first, but persist. Supposing your name is Julia and you dreamt you were carrying an umbrella, but failed to use it even though it was raining, you would talk in the first person present—I am an umbrella. Julia is carrying me but for some reason doesn’t use me.’ Having finished saying what you could about yourself, your friend(s) then ask you questions about yourself as the dream figure or object. These questions need to be simple and directly about the dream symbol. So they could ask Are you an old umbrella?’ Does Julia know she is canying you?’ ‘What is your function as an umbrella? ‘Are you big enough to shelter Julia and someone else?’ And so on.

The aim of the questions is to draw out information about the symbol being explored.

If it is a known person or object you are in the role of—your father for instance—the replies to the questions need to be answered from the point of view of what happened in the dream, rather than as in real life. Listen to what you are saying about yourself as the dream symbol, and when your questioneKs) has finished, review your statements to see if you can see how they refer to your life and yourself.

If you are asking the questions, even if you have ideas regarding the dream, do not attempt to interpret. Put your ideas into simple questions the dreamer can respond to. Maintain a sense of curiosity and attempt to understand, to make the dream plain in an everyday language sense. Lead the dreamer towards seeing what the dream means through the questions. When you have exhausted your questions ask the dreamer to summarise what they have gathered from their replies. See postures, movements and body language for an example of how to work with body movement to explore a dream meaning.

Can / alter the dream to find greater satisfaction? Imagine yourself in the dream and continue it as a fantasy or day­dream. Alter the dream in any way that satisfies. Experiment with it, play with it, until you find a fuller sense of self expres­sion. It is very imponant to note whether any anger or hostil­ity is in the dream but not fully expressed.

If so, let yourself imagine a full expression of the anger. It may be that as this is practised more anger is openly expressed in subsequent dreams. This is healthy, allowing such feelings to be vented and redirected into satisfying ways, individually and socially. In doing this do not ignore any feelings of resistance, pleasure or anxiety. Satisfaction occurs only as we leam to acknowl­edge and integrate resistances and anxieties into what we ex­press. This is a very important step. It gradually changes those of our habits which trap us in lack of satisfaction, poor cre­ativity or inability to resolve problems.

Summary To summarise effectively gather the essence of what you have said about each symbol and the dream as a whole and express it in everyday language. Imagine you are explaining to someone who knows nothing about yourself or the dream. Bnng the dream out of its symbols into everyday comments about yourself.

A man dreamt about a grey, dull office. When he looked at what he said about the office he realised he was talking about the grey, unimaginative world he grew up in after the Second World War, and how it shaped him.

Further information on using these techniques can be found in Tony Crisp s work The Instant Dream Book, published by C.W. Daniel. See amplification; plot of dream; adventure of the dream world; dreamer; postures, movement and body language; settings; symbols and dreaming; word analysis of dreams; wordplay and puns. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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Ariadne's Book of Dream

Processing food may suggest the need to process information that is coming in raptdly as the stimulus from the events of the day or from work. It suggests chopping or pureeing ideas into something more digestible and useful.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

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Christian Dream Symbols

Symbolic of wailing and mourning over the death of something in your life, Jer. 9:17-19... Christian Dream Symbols

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

According to modem theory, the amount of information the human brain can hold is more than is held in all the books in the Library of the British Museum. Gradually it is becoming recognised that informa­tion gathered is not simply what we ‘learn’ from vocal com­munication, or read, or set out to leam. In fact an unimagin­able amount of information gathering has gone on prior to speech, and goes on at an unimaginable speed prior to school years. Consider a small preschool child walking into the gar­den It has learnt gradually to relate to muscular movement, balance and its own motivations and feeling reactions in a way enabling it to walk. It has already grasped thousands of bits of ‘information’ about such things as plants in the garden, the neighbour’s cat, the road outside, possible dangers, safe areas. Stupendous amounts have already been absorbed about interrelationships.

An idea of ‘reality’ in the sense of what is probable, and what would be dangerously out of norm, has been formed. We gather information in ways little recognised. How our parents relate to their environment and to other people is all recorded and leamt from, bringing about enor­mous ‘programming’ affecting how we act in similar circum­stances.

As explained in the entry on the dream as spiritual guide, we have great ability in ‘reading’ symbols, ritual, an, music, body language, architecture, drama, and extracting ‘meaning’ from them. So we have immense stores of information from these sources. Work done with people exploring their dreams over a long period suggests that some of these information resources are never focused on enough to make conscious what we have actually learnt. Sometimes it is enough simply to ask oneself a question to begin to focus some of these resources. Such questions as what social attitude and response to authority did I learn at school? What feeling reaction do I get when I am in the presence of someone I know well? These may help to bring to awareness aspects of information gath­ered but remaining unconscious. These unfocused, or uncon­scious, areas of information can explain why we have appar­ently irrational feeling responses to some people or situations.

the body A lot of what we call the unconscious are basic physiological and psychological functions.

For instance in a modern house, when we flush the toilet, we do not have to bring a bucket of water and fill the cistern again.

A self regu­lating mechanism allows water to flow in and switches it off when full. This is a clever built-in function that had to be done manually at one time. Nowadays we have built into some dwellings fire sprinklers or burglar alarms. Through re­peated actions over thousands or millions of years, many ba­sic functions, or functions only switched on in emergencies, have been built into our being. We do not need to think about them, just as we do not have to give awareness to the fire sprinkling system or toilet each time we walk through a room or flush the toilet. They are therefore unconscious.

Research with animals in connection with rewards and conditioned reflexes has shown that by gradually leading an animal towards a certain performance by rewarding it each time it gets nearer to the goal, it can do the most amazing things. It can increase the circulation of blood to its ear, slow its heart, and in fact influence body functions which were thought to be completely involuntary. Where human beings have learnt to use some of these techniques—such as raising the temperature of an arm at will, or helping to increase the efficiency of the immune system—the actual processes still remain unconscious. In general, however, the body’s func­tions are thought to be outside our awareness, and so are one of the areas of the unconscious. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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My Dream Interpretation

A dream involving a computer mouse may symbolize your difficulty expressing certain feelings or views.

If you dream that your mouse has a mind of its own, you may feel a lack of control in your own life. Perhaps you are feeling overprotected, overwhelmed by stress, or both.... My Dream Interpretation

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Strangest Dream Explanations

See Types of Dreams (Introduction.)... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

To dream of a procession, denotes that alarming fears will possess you relative to the fulfilment of expectations.

If it be a funeral procession, sorrow is fast approaching, and will throw a shadow around pleasures.

To see or participate in a torch-light procession, denotes that you will engage in gaieties which will detract from your real merit.... Ten Thousand Dream Interpretation

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New American Dream Dictionary

1. Formal honors in the offing, advancement.

2. Succes­sion, continuity; maintaining the order of things. ... New American Dream Dictionary

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Little Giant Encyclopedia

See Parade.... Little Giant Encyclopedia

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Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- A procession means an orderly approach and often makes a statement of intent. In a dream, to see a line of people who all appear to have a similar goal or set of beliefs in mind, indicates that it is the intention behind the group which is important. Often a procession is hierarchical, with the most important people either first or last. This could be important in a dream in enabling us to adopt priorities for ourselves.

2- A procession is often a way of marking a special occasion with pageantry and dignity. In dreams such an image can often represent the dreamer’s need to have his own successes and abilities recognised.

To be taking part in a procession is acknowledging our need to belong to a like-minded group.

To be watching a procession is to appreciate other people’s single-mindedness.

3- Spiritually, a procession is indicative of a group of like-minded people but also of people who have great knowledge. In dreams we are recognising the importance of whatever svstcm of belief or religion we belong to. We recognise rcspect must be paid.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

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Gypsy Dream Dictionary

Symbolizes constancy in love.... Gypsy Dream Dictionary

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The Complete Dream Book

To dream of watching a military or political procession is a portent of a new but unprofitable business venture.... The Complete Dream Book

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Mystic Dream Book

To witness a Procession in your dream is a good sign for t he lover or married person.

The longer it lasts, the better, for many years of happiness are fore- told.... Mystic Dream Book

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Strangest Dream Explanations

Dreams of a procession represent that you are entering into a ceremonial, celebratory time of your life, and that you are preparing for a great change. Consider the feeling tone.... Strangest Dream Explanations

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

Spiritually, a procession is indicative of a group of like-minded people but also of people who have great knowledge. In dreams we are recognizing the importance of whatever system of belief or religion we belong to. We recognize respect must be paid.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

Psychological / emotional perspective: A procession is often a way of marking a special occasion with pageantry and dignity. In dreams such an image can often represent our need to have our own successes and abilities recognized.

To be taking part in a procession is acknowledging our need to belong to a like-minded group.

To be watching a procession is to appreciate other people’s single-mindedness.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: A procession means an orderly approach and often makes a statement of intent. In a dream, to see a line of people who all appear to have a similar goal or set of beliefs in mind, indicates that it is the intention behind the group which is important. Often a procession is hierarchical, with the most important people either first or last. This could be important in a dream in enabling us to adopt priorities for ourselves.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

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Ariadne's Book of Dream

Insufficient RAM in your personal computer in a dream may signal that you have forgotten something important. It may reflect absentmindedness or forgetful- ness.... Ariadne's Book of Dream

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A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Can simply be the son of pleasure we feel on listening to music; the impressions left on us by events, people, and therefore memory, but often memory integrated by the unconscious into insights; the im­pression we might leave behind at death—what remains of us; the impression we would like to give others. Idioms: for the record; track record. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

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