Bowel Movement | Dream Meanings

What does Bowel Movement mean in dream?

Bowel Movement | Dream Meanings

Keywords of this dream: Bowel Movement


The Language of Dreams

(see Clock)... The Language of Dreams

New American Dream Dictionary

1. A positive omen (to have a bowel movement).

2. A need or desire to “eliminate” old patterns of thinking or behavior.

3. Communication, usually of feelings and painful issues. ... New American Dream Dictionary

Strangest Dream Explanations

See Feces.... Strangest Dream Explanations

Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Digested emotions; improper location of elimination is taking advantage; see “bathroom”... Dream Dictionary Unlimited

Islamic Dream Interpretation

(See Intestines)... Islamic Dream Interpretation

My Dream Interpretation

If you dream of being disemboweled (where your guts fall out of your stomach), this means you feel like your strength or ability to stand up for yourself is being attacked. Alternately, consider the common phrase “you have a lot of guts.”... My Dream Interpretation

Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

1- Movement in dreams is usually- highlighted to make the dreamer aware of progress. Moving forward suggests an acceptance of one’s abilities, while moving backwards signifies withdrawal from a situation. Moving sideways would suggest a deliberate act of avoidance.

2- The way we move in dreams can indicate a great deal about our acceptance of ourselves.

For instance, to be moving briskly would suggest an easy acceptance of the necessity for change, whereas being moved - such as on sonic kind of moving walkway would signify being moved by outside circumstances or at the wish of other people.

3- A movement towards Spiritual Acceptance can be undertaken when the time is considered to be right.... Ten Thousand Dream Dictionary

The Language of Dreams

(see Directions, Velocity)... The Language of Dreams

Dream Meanings of Versatile

A movement towards spiritual acceptance can be undertaken when the time is considered to be right. Movement in dreams is usually highlighted to make us aware of our progress. Spiritually, movement such as dance is an act of worship or adoration.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Psychological / emotional perspective: The way we move in dreams can indicate a great deal about our motivations.

For instance, to be moving briskly would suggest an easy acceptance of the necessity for change, whereas being moved – such as on some kind of moving walkway – would signify being moved by outside circumstances or at the wish of other people.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Dream Meanings of Versatile

Material aspects: Moving forward suggests an acceptance of our abilities, while moving backwards signifies withdrawal from a situation. Moving sideways would suggest a deliberate act of avoidance.... Dream Meanings of Versatile

Islamic Dream - Cafer-i Sadik

interpreted upon 5 sides: sickness, sorrow, dispute & importunity / obstinacy, a violation with his people, and his family.... Islamic Dream - Cafer-i Sadik

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Even in everyday life, the way we hold and position our body, the inclination of chest and head, the movement of hands, are a means of com­munication.

The apparently intuitive information in some dreams, when investigated, can be traced to an unconscious insight into the language of the living body. We all have this ability to understand body language, but it seems to be some­thing which is inherited from past times before verbal lan­guage. It therefore remains a largely unconscious ability. In our dreams, however, it is a major factor in how the dream is structured.

If you cannot find a satisfying description below, imagine yourself making the movement or posture in the dream to see if you can define what the feeling quality is, or what you are saying non-verbally. It can often be of value to make the movement or take up the posture physically instead of in the imagination. By comparing the movement/posture with an­other one, it can help to clarify its quality.

Example: Marilyn was expenencing emotional pain con­nected with her impending divorce. Marilyn had dreamt of seeing a dinosaur standing in her path, devounng all who approached it. We explored it by having Marilyn find a body posture and movements which for her expressed the feeling of the dinosaur. In doing so Marilyn did not sense anger or aggression, but she did feel like a predator which always had to take to gain her own needs. This feeling immediately re­minded her of her family life as a child. She remembered when she was sent shopping as a very young child of three or four; as well as buying what she had been asked, she pur­chased some sweets for herself. When she arrived home she was treated as if she had done a terrible thing, and that was where she began to feel like a predator. It seemed to her as if her own needs were always gained at the expense of someone else.

‘With this awareness, she could now see that the dinosaur standing iti her path clearly related to her present situation. Bargaining to gain a realistic share of the house and property jointly owned by her husband and herself, felt to her as if she were gaining her needs at his expense, like a predator. That made her feel so awful, she was almost ready to allow her husband to take all, leaving her without house or money to start again. Her awareness of where the feelings arose from, and the unrealistic pan they played in her life, allowed her to relate to the situation with less pain and more wisdom’ (from Mind and Movement, Tony Crisp). ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences

Adrian Morrison at the University of Pennsylvania, investigating narcolepsy, a condition producing sleep in the middle of activity, found that a small area of the brain, the pons, suppresses full muscular movement while we dream.

If this area is damaged or suppressed, humans or ani­mals make full muscular movements in connection with what is dreamt. He observed that cats would stalk, crouch and spring at imaginary prey. These very imponant findings sug­gest a number of things.

The unconscious process behind dreaming, apan from creating a non-volitional fantasy, can also reproduce movements we have not consciously decided upon. This shows we have at least two centres of will which can direct body and mental processes. Christopher Evans, linking with the work of Nicholas Humphrey at Cambridge University, sees the movements of dreaming cats as expres­sions of survival ‘programs’ in the biological computer. These ‘programs’ or strategies for survival need to be replayed in order not only to keep in practice, but also to modify them in connection with the influx of extra experience and informa­tion. In the human realm, our survival strategies and the way we relate to our social, sexual, marriage and work roles may also be replayed and modified in our dreaming.

Such movements are not linked simply to survival or social programs’.

An important aspect of dreaming is releasing painful emotions or trauma, and moving toward psychological growth. Also, the process producing these movements does not keep strictly to the realm of sleep. It is observable that many muscular spasms, ticks, or unwilled waking movements arise from this source—the will’ of the unconscious—at­tempting to release trauma or initiate a necessary programme of psychological growth. That such dream’ activities as spon­taneous movement or verbalisation should occur during wak­ing would appear to suggest that a dream must occur with them. Research shows this is unlikely. It does however show that a dream may be imagery produced to express this mental, muscular, emotional ‘self regulation’.

The imagery may not be necessary if the process is consciously experienced.

Because the self-regulatory process produces spontaneous movements, emotions and verbalisation, it is likely there is a connection between it and many ancient religious practices such as pentecostalism, shaktipat in India, subud in Indonesia and seitai in Japan. These are forms of psychotherapy prac­tised by other cultures. They create an environment in which practitioners can allow spontaneous movement and fantasy while awake. Because consciousness is then involved, and can co-operate with the self-regulating or healing activities of the unconscious, such practice can lead to better health and utilisation of unconscious functions.

The older religious forms of this practice relied on belief systems of spirits or gods. Once the connection between these practices and the dream is realised, much in them which was obscure becomes under­standable. In my book Mind and Movement I explain the con­nection between the dream process, self regulatory healing, extended perception and waking consciousness. See abreac­tion; sleep walking; dream as therapist and healer. ... A Guide to Dreams and Sleep Experiences